Shoulder
Slap Tears
PSI (PGII)
Rotator Interval
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Rotator Cuff
Recurrent Dislocation
Internal Impingement
ACJ SCJ
Neural Compression
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Injuries to the superior glenoid labrum are called SLAP lesions, the letters standing for superior labrum anterior to posterior. These injuries are most commonly encountered in throwing athletes and following falls on the outstretched hand. The abnormality involves the origin of the long head of biceps from the superior aspect of the glenoid, an anatomic an area which is called the biceps labral anchor.The superior labrum, like its counterpart in the acetabulum is a fibrocartilaginous structure which returns low signal on most MR sequences. Like the knee meniscus, signal changes within the labrum usually indicates injury. Signal changes on the deep surface of the labrum may occur as a variation of normal. Also like the knee meniscus signal changes may occur with increasing age as a consequence of labral degeneration.

More acute injuries, particularly in younger people, lead to a linear areas of signal alteration which are more likely to be significant tears. Several types of SLAP lesions have been described. Whilst there are numerous subtypes, it is really only important to distinguish a normal /degenerate from a torn labrum. A degenerate labrum will show diffuse areas of signal alteration on T2 or intermediate weighted MR images particularly involving the free edge. This is called a type 1 slap lesion.
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