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Biceps & Bursae
Brachialis
Median Nerve
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Anatomy
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Cubital Bursitis.
FABS position
Distal Biceps Disease
The biceps brachii muscle produces flexion and supination of the elbow. The distal biceps tendon traverses through the antecubital fossa to insert on to the bicipital tuberosity. Some of the superficial tendon fibers form the bicipital aponeurosis by passing over and blending with the fascia of the flexor-pronator. This structure is also referred to as the lacertus fibrosis. The distal biceps tendon comprises 2 components, one each from the long and short heads of the biceps muscle. The short head component is more superficial and inserts more distally.

A number of bursae have been described in the anticubital fossa.

The largest is the bicipitoradial bursa which surrounds the biceps tendon. the smallest is between the radius and ulna called the bicipitoradial bursa. This can become inflamed with repetitive pronation and supination.

In typical position for elbow scanning, the distal biceps tendon is best evaluated on axial images. In cases where the biceps tendon is under specific investigation, use of the FABS position can be helpful to show the tendon in long axis.

In chronic disease, the biceps tendon may either appear thickened, fragmented or attenuated with surrounding fluid in the sheath. Cubital bursitis may be associated. The typical finding is the tendon passing through the enlarged bursa.
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Biceps Rupture
upture of the distal biceps tendon typically results from a sudden extension force applied to the arm with the elbow held in 90 of flexion and may be seen in weight lifters and body builders, particularly if they are smokers or are taking anabolic steroids.

The report should note:
  • Extent of retraction
  • Presence of a remaining stump of tissue
  • Involvement of the aponeurosis
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