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Triceps tend apathy is less common than biceps tendinopathy. Many cases are associated with systemic enthesopathies but isolated injuries also occur. Increased signal on MRI and loss of normal fibre integrity and increased Doppler signal on ultrasound are typical.

Rupture of the triceps tendon is rare. The injury is often on an out- stretched hand or a forced flexion agains resistance. The latter may occur in body building. Anabolic steroid use predisposes. Other sporting associations include high-impact sports such as football, rugby, or american football. Additional risk factors include oral or injected corticosteroids, olecranon bursitis, inflammatory arthritis, or renal insufficiency with hyperparathyroidism.

Partial tears of the tendinous portion of the insertion (itself only part of the total insertion which includes the more muscular medial head insertion), rupture of the muscle belly, or myotendinous strains are also rare. The triceps tendon usually avulses from the olecranon process. Radiographs may demonstrate a small bony fragment. Both MRI and ultrasound can be used to confirm the diagnosis, and are helpful in differentiating between partial and complete tears. MRI shows a gap within the distal triceps tendon in complete tears, and can be used to assess the degree of retraction of the tendon end.
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Triceps
Olecranon Bursa
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