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The posterolateral corner is supported by the biceps femurs tendon, the fibular collateral ligament and the popliteus complex as well as a number of other smaller ligamentous structures which are little more than condensations of the posterolateral capsule. Biceps femoris arises from the ischial tuberosity and descends in the posterolateral compartment to insert on the fibular head. The fibular collateral ligament averages 67mm in length and 3.4 mm in thickness. Its femoral attachment is 3mm posterior to the ridge of the lateral femoral condyle above and a little anterior to the popliteus tendon. It inserts on a V shaped bony depression that extends to the distal one-third of the lateral aspect of the fibula. The insertion can be either on its own or as a conjoint tendon with the biceps. If they are separated, the insertion of the FCL is more anterior and medial than biceps. The third major component of the PLC is the popliteus tendon
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The third major component of the posterolateral corner is the posterior capsule with specifically named ligamentous condensations. These minor ligaments can be divided into the long and short ligaments. The long ligament is the fabellofibular ligament if a fabella is present and an arcuate ligament if it is not. The short ligament is the fibulopopliteal ligament. These ligaments are variously identified on MR imaging. Coronal oblique imaging orientated to the posterior limb of the posterior cruciate is said to improve visualisation but this still remains less than fifty percent of cases. Non-visualisation therefore is difficult to interpret and tears of these specific ligaments are difficult to identify on MRI.Coronal images have also been advocated for visualising the fabellofibular ligament . Injuries to the posterolateral corner are most commonly caused by a combination of rotation and varus stress. They are less common than medial collateral ligament injuries but are more disabling. They are associated with full thickness ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament when, on occasion, the clinical signs of cruciate rupture can mask the presence of posterolateral instability. It has been said that an overlooked posterolateral corner injury is the commonest cause of anterior cruciate ligament graft failure, but not all authors agree.
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