ACL Partial Tear
Some ACL's do not look frankly ruptured, but appear discontinuous, kinked or otherwise abnormal. Others demonstrate enlarged sheaths with fibres separated by fluid material. The ill defined ACL may appear so because of partial tears but there is overlap between normal and high grade injuries.

To resolve these, all imaging planes should be assessed first. If there is still doubt, signs of anterior tibial translation should be sought. If these are positive, a high grade tear is more likely. Even if negative, the presence of clinical instability points to a high grade (complete rather than partial) tear. ACL reconstruction is unlikely to be performed in the absence of clinical instability.

The aetiology and clinical significance of cruciate ganglia is uncertain. Many are like assymptomatic though some symptoms resolve following aspiration. Whether they are the result of mucoid degeneration or injury is also unresolved.
ACL Ganglion
ACL Ganglion
PCL Partial Tear
The PCl has two bundles : anterolateral and posteromedial. The anterolateral bundle is the larger, involving 70% of the total. It is tight in flexion
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Partial PCL tear posteromedial bundle
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Intraartic Ligs
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