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Tibialis Posterior
FHL
Deltoid Ligament
Spring Ligament
Tarsal Tunnel
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Ankle & Foot
Shoulder
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Medial Pain
Lateral Pain
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Posterior pain
Anterior pain
Forefoot Pain
Miscellaneous
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The ligaments on the medial aspect of the foot are less frequently injured than those on the lateral side. Surgical procedures are also less often carried out and consequently request to image the structures are also less common. The anatomy of the medial ligaments is complex. Three layers are recognised, the superficial layer, and deep layer and a transverse layer.

There are two ligaments in the deep layer passing between the tibia and the os calcis. One lies anterior and the other posterior. Injuries are relatively common but usually heal without sequelae.

Chronic injuries may lead to ligament hypertrophy, calcification and neovascularisation resulting in an impingement syndrome. Anteromedial and posteromedial impingement are relatively uncommon compared with anterior, anterolateral and posterior impingement.

There are three ligaments in the superficial layer named for their origin and insertion. Two of these run between bony structures. The anterior ligament is the tibionavicular and the posterior is the tibiocalcaneal ligament. The largest of these three ligaments runs between the tibia and the spring ligament and consequently is named the tibiospring ligament. The transverse component of the medial ligament complex is the spring ligament. This is discussed in another section.
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Anteromedial and posteromedial impingement are uncommon and generally poorly described entities. Most authorities relate this to abnormalities of the anterior and posterior talocalcaneal ligaments which form the deepest layer of the medial ligament or deltoid ligament complex. Chronic eversion injury results in enthesopathy and partial tearing of these ligaments with associated calcification and surrounding granulation tissue formation. Compression injury during version may also lead to ligament injury. The enlarging ligament based mass leads to pain and limitation of movement on the medial aspect of the joint.
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